The Monkey Mind 

Let’s get this straight: the marketing world is bizarre, and not just run-of-the-mill strange, but profoundly peculiar. It’s like a never-ending carousel that spins faster with every lap, thanks to the digital age’s relentless push. And riding upfront on this chaotic ride is our very own Monkey Mind.


In Buddhist teachings, the term “Monkey Mind” refers to a restless, unsettled, and sometimes uncontrollable mental state. Picture a monkey, swinging from tree to tree, grabbing one fruit only to drop it for another, never truly satisfied or still. It’s an apt metaphor for our thoughts, which hop from one topic to another, often without completion or clarity. This feels eerily prophetic in today’s digital age, where distractions are rife and attention spans are brief.

Anyone who’s spent more than a hot minute in marketing knows that focus isn’t just ‘nice-to-have’; it’s the lifeblood of strategic thinking and impact. But with our inner monkey leaping about, how do we find that focus?

1. Recognize the Monkey for What It Is: The Monkey Mind isn’t your enemy. It’s a part of you — curious, energetic, and sometimes a tad overenthusiastic. Recognize it, understand its nature, and you’re halfway to befriending it.

2. Go Bananas (Strategically): Let your inner monkey have its fun sometimes. Brainstorming session? Time and place. Explore every wild, uncharted idea territory. You never know where you might strike gold.

3. Meditation. The most powerful tool to calm the Monkey Mind. Even just a few minutes can anchor your thoughts, allowing for deeper concentration and clarity.

4. The Right Toy for the Right Moment: When it’s time to focus, offer it the right distraction — for me, it’s calming music.

5. Reward and Redirect: When you achieve a milestone, treat yourself. And when distractions pull you away, gently, without self-judgment, bring your focus back.

Mastering the Monkey Mind in Marketing is tough. It’s about understanding its playful nature, setting boundaries, and harnessing its energy for impact and outcome.